THE BLORGENGE - BRECON BEACONS    The Blorenge overlooks the town of Abergavenny, and along with The Sugarloaf and The Skirrid, is one of three prominent mountains to do so. The road that climbs up the north-west face of this mountain is known as The Tumble. It’s one of South Wales’ most challenging cycle climbs and has featured in many stages of The Tour of Britain. The top of The Tumble is marked by Keeper’s Pond. The views from here are spectacular, reaching far down the Usk Valley whilst also taking in the high peaked horizon of old coal tips. Keeper’s Pond is often referred to as 'nature's infinity pool’ and is popular with wild swimmers, its easy vehicular access and car park makes it a busy location. Nearby you will find The Punchbowl, a glacial wooded cwm with a small lake nestled in the hillside. We recommend saving your picnic for this more secretive spot.

THE BLORGENGE - BRECON BEACONS

The Blorenge overlooks the town of Abergavenny, and along with The Sugarloaf and The Skirrid, is one of three prominent mountains to do so. The road that climbs up the north-west face of this mountain is known as The Tumble. It’s one of South Wales’ most challenging cycle climbs and has featured in many stages of The Tour of Britain. The top of The Tumble is marked by Keeper’s Pond. The views from here are spectacular, reaching far down the Usk Valley whilst also taking in the high peaked horizon of old coal tips. Keeper’s Pond is often referred to as 'nature's infinity pool’ and is popular with wild swimmers, its easy vehicular access and car park makes it a busy location. Nearby you will find The Punchbowl, a glacial wooded cwm with a small lake nestled in the hillside. We recommend saving your picnic for this more secretive spot.

CWM OERGWM VALLEY - BRECON BEACONS    The highest point on this route is the summit of Fan Y Big, part of the Central Beacons which form the highest mountains in the southern UK. From here, you can clearly see the summit trail that crosses the peaks of Cribyn, Pen Y Fan and Corn Du, but with the advantage of being on the easterly and therefore less congested side. Looking north over the precipice, the dramatic Cwm Oergwm valley stretches out towards mid-wales. Keep an eye out for red kites catching thermals, and on a clear day, the sea to the south.

CWM OERGWM VALLEY - BRECON BEACONS

The highest point on this route is the summit of Fan Y Big, part of the Central Beacons which form the highest mountains in the southern UK. From here, you can clearly see the summit trail that crosses the peaks of Cribyn, Pen Y Fan and Corn Du, but with the advantage of being on the easterly and therefore less congested side. Looking north over the precipice, the dramatic Cwm Oergwm valley stretches out towards mid-wales. Keep an eye out for red kites catching thermals, and on a clear day, the sea to the south.

THE LEGEND OF CADAIR IDRIS - SNOWDONIA    Idris Gawr is a mythological Welsh giant, poet and astronomer, said to be so large he could sit on the summit of Cadair Idris (Idris’ chair) to survey his kingdom and look up to the stars. The legend goes on to declare that if anyone should spend a night at the summit of Cadair Idris, he or she will awake as either a madman or a poet. We can neither confirm nor deny whether this is true today, but if you decide to spend a night on these slopes, beware of Cŵn Annwn, the hounds of the underworld, as this is their hunting ground and "the howling of these huge dogs foretells death to anyone who hears them”.  If you survive and make it to the summit (known as Penygadair, or 'top of the chair'), a small stone shelter can be found to the east of the cairn. This stone building, which could easily be overlooked, was once a Victorian refreshments hut, where rumour has it, one lone lady prepared hot drinks to passers-by.

THE LEGEND OF CADAIR IDRIS - SNOWDONIA

Idris Gawr is a mythological Welsh giant, poet and astronomer, said to be so large he could sit on the summit of Cadair Idris (Idris’ chair) to survey his kingdom and look up to the stars. The legend goes on to declare that if anyone should spend a night at the summit of Cadair Idris, he or she will awake as either a madman or a poet. We can neither confirm nor deny whether this is true today, but if you decide to spend a night on these slopes, beware of Cŵn Annwn, the hounds of the underworld, as this is their hunting ground and "the howling of these huge dogs foretells death to anyone who hears them”.

If you survive and make it to the summit (known as Penygadair, or 'top of the chair'), a small stone shelter can be found to the east of the cairn. This stone building, which could easily be overlooked, was once a Victorian refreshments hut, where rumour has it, one lone lady prepared hot drinks to passers-by.

PREHISTORIC LIFE - PRESELI HILLS    The Preseli’s are rich with prehistoric history and evidence of Neolithic life. These hills are strewn with burial chambers, hill forts and settlement remains. Foel Drygarn is topped with three distinct cairns which date back almost 4000 years and are likely to have been constructed as bronze age burial chambers. Slightly later in the Iron Age, a hilltop fort was built around the cairns and the remains of hundreds of circular hut foundations have been identified at the summit by aerial photography.  After descending Foel Drygarn, you find a high path that runs along the spine of the Preseli range, known as The Golden Road - believed to be part of an ancient highway connecting the Wicklow Hills in Ireland (and the gold mined there) with southern England.  And finally, whilst still high in the hills, The Golden Road takes you past the base of Carn Menyn, where there is evidence to suggest that the massive bluestones that make up Stonehenge, 160 miles away in Wiltshire, were transported from here over 4,000 years ago.

PREHISTORIC LIFE - PRESELI HILLS

The Preseli’s are rich with prehistoric history and evidence of Neolithic life. These hills are strewn with burial chambers, hill forts and settlement remains. Foel Drygarn is topped with three distinct cairns which date back almost 4000 years and are likely to have been constructed as bronze age burial chambers. Slightly later in the Iron Age, a hilltop fort was built around the cairns and the remains of hundreds of circular hut foundations have been identified at the summit by aerial photography.

After descending Foel Drygarn, you find a high path that runs along the spine of the Preseli range, known as The Golden Road - believed to be part of an ancient highway connecting the Wicklow Hills in Ireland (and the gold mined there) with southern England.

And finally, whilst still high in the hills, The Golden Road takes you past the base of Carn Menyn, where there is evidence to suggest that the massive bluestones that make up Stonehenge, 160 miles away in Wiltshire, were transported from here over 4,000 years ago.