CAT BELLS & HIGH SPY RIDGE - LAKE DISTRICT    Cat Bells is one of the Lake District’s favourite fells. Its name is thought to come from “Cat Bields” meaning the “Lair of the Wildcat”, sadly no wild cats will be spotted on this trip. Its proximity to Keswick and its relatively accessible height (451m) makes it popular for all hiking abilities. The path heads straight up the conical peak and the far-reaching views from the summit include Skiddaw and Blencathra.  Once beyond Cat Bells, the number of fellow hikers will usually disperse, retracing their steps back down to the Lake. The initial steep slopes of Cat Bells are replaced with a gradual incline upwards as you follow the ridge towards Maiden Moor and High Spy where on a clear day the peak of Scafell Pike should be visible.

CAT BELLS & HIGH SPY RIDGE - LAKE DISTRICT

Cat Bells is one of the Lake District’s favourite fells. Its name is thought to come from “Cat Bields” meaning the “Lair of the Wildcat”, sadly no wild cats will be spotted on this trip. Its proximity to Keswick and its relatively accessible height (451m) makes it popular for all hiking abilities. The path heads straight up the conical peak and the far-reaching views from the summit include Skiddaw and Blencathra.

Once beyond Cat Bells, the number of fellow hikers will usually disperse, retracing their steps back down to the Lake. The initial steep slopes of Cat Bells are replaced with a gradual incline upwards as you follow the ridge towards Maiden Moor and High Spy where on a clear day the peak of Scafell Pike should be visible.

BOWDER STONE - LAKE DISTRICT    The Bowder stone is a 2000 ton boulder that sits balanced on its edge at the bottom of Bowder Crag. It is an unlikely tourist spot but has been attracting visitors for over 200 years. It is unknown how the mammoth rock ended up at this site, and in its unlikely position, but the best theory is that it fell from the crag overhead between 13,500 and 10,000 years ago.  It was a wealthy man named Joseph Pocklington in 1798 who first monetised the stone by building a ladder to the top and fencing off the immediate area, paying visitors were given access to what was described as ‘probably the biggest stone in the world’. As well as climbing the stone, you were also invited to put your hand through a hole at its base and have a ‘handshake of luck’ whilst hoping that the boulder above wouldn’t topple from its precarious position.

BOWDER STONE - LAKE DISTRICT

The Bowder stone is a 2000 ton boulder that sits balanced on its edge at the bottom of Bowder Crag. It is an unlikely tourist spot but has been attracting visitors for over 200 years. It is unknown how the mammoth rock ended up at this site, and in its unlikely position, but the best theory is that it fell from the crag overhead between 13,500 and 10,000 years ago.

It was a wealthy man named Joseph Pocklington in 1798 who first monetised the stone by building a ladder to the top and fencing off the immediate area, paying visitors were given access to what was described as ‘probably the biggest stone in the world’. As well as climbing the stone, you were also invited to put your hand through a hole at its base and have a ‘handshake of luck’ whilst hoping that the boulder above wouldn’t topple from its precarious position.

HAWESWATER SUBMERGED VILLAGE - LAKE DISTRICT    Haweswater is a reservoir to the far east of the Lake District where submerged villages lie just beneath the surface of the water. The valley was flooded in 1935 to supply Manchester with water and to this day when the water levels are low, what remains of the villages become visible once more.  This valley was home to the last remaining Golden Eagles in England. Unfortunately, sightings have become unbelievably rare adding to the general consensus that the lone male bird may have died. There is talk of reintroducing eagle chicks back into this landscape as well as a program of habitat restoration which is currently underway and has the possibility of attracting new birds to the valley.

HAWESWATER SUBMERGED VILLAGE - LAKE DISTRICT

Haweswater is a reservoir to the far east of the Lake District where submerged villages lie just beneath the surface of the water. The valley was flooded in 1935 to supply Manchester with water and to this day when the water levels are low, what remains of the villages become visible once more.

This valley was home to the last remaining Golden Eagles in England. Unfortunately, sightings have become unbelievably rare adding to the general consensus that the lone male bird may have died. There is talk of reintroducing eagle chicks back into this landscape as well as a program of habitat restoration which is currently underway and has the possibility of attracting new birds to the valley.

CANAL TUNNELS - MARSDEN    Marsden sits on the border of the Peak District and Pennines which makes it the perfect place to start a walk. It is also where the Huddersfield Narrow Canal makes its way underground through the UK’s longest, deepest and highest canal tunnel, linking Yorkshire with Manchester. The Standedge tunnel was dug from both ends with the sections finally meeting in 1809 to create the 5,000m long expanse. Boat trips through the tunnel happen regularly but places are limited and times can vary, so it’s best to call ahead.

CANAL TUNNELS - MARSDEN

Marsden sits on the border of the Peak District and Pennines which makes it the perfect place to start a walk. It is also where the Huddersfield Narrow Canal makes its way underground through the UK’s longest, deepest and highest canal tunnel, linking Yorkshire with Manchester. The Standedge tunnel was dug from both ends with the sections finally meeting in 1809 to create the 5,000m long expanse. Boat trips through the tunnel happen regularly but places are limited and times can vary, so it’s best to call ahead.

MILLICAN DALTON CAVE - LAKE DISTRICT    The steep southeastern flanks of Castle Crag remain scarred with the legacy of High Hows Quarry, in the 1920’s the caves that were left abandoned there became inhabited by a man called Millican Dalton. He was an outdoor enthusiast and early pioneer of adventure who chose to give up his life as an insurance clerk to live in this split-level cave on and off for nearly 50 years.  Millican would lead climbing and camping expeditions into the mountains and thought of himself as a ‘professor of adventure’. As well as earning a modest living as a guide, Millican experimented with producing light-weight camping kit. Aside from this minimal income, he existed mostly as a self-sufficient vegetarian teetotaller.

MILLICAN DALTON CAVE - LAKE DISTRICT

The steep southeastern flanks of Castle Crag remain scarred with the legacy of High Hows Quarry, in the 1920’s the caves that were left abandoned there became inhabited by a man called Millican Dalton. He was an outdoor enthusiast and early pioneer of adventure who chose to give up his life as an insurance clerk to live in this split-level cave on and off for nearly 50 years.

Millican would lead climbing and camping expeditions into the mountains and thought of himself as a ‘professor of adventure’. As well as earning a modest living as a guide, Millican experimented with producing light-weight camping kit. Aside from this minimal income, he existed mostly as a self-sufficient vegetarian teetotaller.

CASTLE CRAG - LAKE DISTRICT    Castle Crag is a perfect miniature mountain that sits in the Jaws of Borrowdale. The path begins at the river’s edge in the wooded valley but quickly starts to climb as the landscape changes and evidence of extensive quarrying becomes visible. The path at one point is almost entirely camouflaged amongst a sheer wall of slate and scree. At just 290m it is one of the Lake Districts shorter hikes and the smallest of the Wainwright peaks, however, once at the summit the views are generously rewarding for the relatively minimal effort taken to reach the top.

CASTLE CRAG - LAKE DISTRICT

Castle Crag is a perfect miniature mountain that sits in the Jaws of Borrowdale. The path begins at the river’s edge in the wooded valley but quickly starts to climb as the landscape changes and evidence of extensive quarrying becomes visible. The path at one point is almost entirely camouflaged amongst a sheer wall of slate and scree. At just 290m it is one of the Lake Districts shorter hikes and the smallest of the Wainwright peaks, however, once at the summit the views are generously rewarding for the relatively minimal effort taken to reach the top.

RESERVOIR RUNOFF - MARSDEN    Butterley Reservoir sits at the end of a series of reservoirs that continue into the valley beyond. At the end of Butterley Reservoir is the runoff that directs water into the former cloth mills below. The huge steps create a beautiful sight and sound as the water cascades down the slope.

RESERVOIR RUNOFF - MARSDEN

Butterley Reservoir sits at the end of a series of reservoirs that continue into the valley beyond. At the end of Butterley Reservoir is the runoff that directs water into the former cloth mills below. The huge steps create a beautiful sight and sound as the water cascades down the slope.