SKELTON TOWER - NORTH YORKSHIRE    Skelton Tower is a ruined folly that can be found near the Hole of Horcum; it was a former shooting lodge built in 1830. Its position perched on the edge of the hillside means that it benefits from spectacular views over the forests and moors to the north and steam trains that occasionally pass by in the valley below.

SKELTON TOWER - NORTH YORKSHIRE

Skelton Tower is a ruined folly that can be found near the Hole of Horcum; it was a former shooting lodge built in 1830. Its position perched on the edge of the hillside means that it benefits from spectacular views over the forests and moors to the north and steam trains that occasionally pass by in the valley below.

HOLE OF HORCUM - NORTH YORKSHIRE    The Hole of Horcum is an impressive hollow in the North York Moors; local legends tell of Wade the Giant who angrily scooped up handfuls of earth to throw at his wife during an argument. The hollow is 1.2km across and 120 metres deep and still bears the marks of Wade’s fingers as he scooped up the earth.

HOLE OF HORCUM - NORTH YORKSHIRE

The Hole of Horcum is an impressive hollow in the North York Moors; local legends tell of Wade the Giant who angrily scooped up handfuls of earth to throw at his wife during an argument. The hollow is 1.2km across and 120 metres deep and still bears the marks of Wade’s fingers as he scooped up the earth.

GORDALE SCAR - YORKSHIRE DALES    Gordale Scar is a narrow gorge where dramatic limestone cliffs, over 100 meters high, tower over the footpath and beck below.  There is an incredible route that climbs the waterfall at the very end of Gordale Scar but we suggest doing a little research before attempting this more extreme (but exciting) route. Even without this climb Gordale Scar is well worth the visit.

GORDALE SCAR - YORKSHIRE DALES

Gordale Scar is a narrow gorge where dramatic limestone cliffs, over 100 meters high, tower over the footpath and beck below.

There is an incredible route that climbs the waterfall at the very end of Gordale Scar but we suggest doing a little research before attempting this more extreme (but exciting) route. Even without this climb Gordale Scar is well worth the visit.

MALHAM COVE - YORKSHIRE DALES    Malham Cove is a popular point of interest. This famous limestone pavement was created over 12,000 years ago by glacial meltwater, which flowed as an 80-meter high waterfall over the rock face and into the valley below. The rock face is now dry, the original stream disappears into the porous ground just south of Malham Tarn before emerging through subterranean streams at the bottom of the Limestone cliffs. This old waterfall is now the playground of rock climbers who can be spotted carefully making their way up the rock face.

MALHAM COVE - YORKSHIRE DALES

Malham Cove is a popular point of interest. This famous limestone pavement was created over 12,000 years ago by glacial meltwater, which flowed as an 80-meter high waterfall over the rock face and into the valley below. The rock face is now dry, the original stream disappears into the porous ground just south of Malham Tarn before emerging through subterranean streams at the bottom of the Limestone cliffs. This old waterfall is now the playground of rock climbers who can be spotted carefully making their way up the rock face.

GAPING GILL & INGLEBOROGH CAVE - YORKSHIRE DALES    The Yorkshire Dales is defined by the limestone it is made of. Look beneath your feet, and you will discover a world carved out by water resulting in tunnels and cave systems that stretch out for miles. The area is littered with potholes, tiny entrances to this underground world. It is not an uncommon sight to come across a group of waterproof-clad humans about to brave the dark passages below. At the foot of Ingleborough is the 98-metre deep pothole, Gaping Gill. This point of interest is barely visible until you are peering over its edge. Once a year the  Bradford Pothole Club  lower willing participants into the gloom to visit the vast cavern below. If you daren’t brave the drop,  Ingleborough Cave  is an alternative, far more accessible but in no way disappointing. The darkness hides previous visitors to the area in the form of fossilised creatures who once lived at the bottom of an ancient ocean.

GAPING GILL & INGLEBOROGH CAVE - YORKSHIRE DALES

The Yorkshire Dales is defined by the limestone it is made of. Look beneath your feet, and you will discover a world carved out by water resulting in tunnels and cave systems that stretch out for miles. The area is littered with potholes, tiny entrances to this underground world. It is not an uncommon sight to come across a group of waterproof-clad humans about to brave the dark passages below. At the foot of Ingleborough is the 98-metre deep pothole, Gaping Gill. This point of interest is barely visible until you are peering over its edge. Once a year the Bradford Pothole Club lower willing participants into the gloom to visit the vast cavern below. If you daren’t brave the drop, Ingleborough Cave is an alternative, far more accessible but in no way disappointing. The darkness hides previous visitors to the area in the form of fossilised creatures who once lived at the bottom of an ancient ocean.