JENNY GREENTEETH LEGEND - PEAK DISTRICT    Along the central path that follows the ridge of The Roaches, there is a small mere called the Doxey Pool. It is said that a young girl once fell in and drowned, and now a malicious mermaid called Jenny Greenteeth inhabits the pool, enticing passersby, especially unwary children to their watery grave. Equally unbelievable and yet true, there is a colony of wallabies that made The Roaches their home after escaping from a nearby zoo during World War Two, and although rarely sighted, still inhabit the area.

JENNY GREENTEETH LEGEND - PEAK DISTRICT

Along the central path that follows the ridge of The Roaches, there is a small mere called the Doxey Pool. It is said that a young girl once fell in and drowned, and now a malicious mermaid called Jenny Greenteeth inhabits the pool, enticing passersby, especially unwary children to their watery grave. Equally unbelievable and yet true, there is a colony of wallabies that made The Roaches their home after escaping from a nearby zoo during World War Two, and although rarely sighted, still inhabit the area.

THE VIEW FROM WORCESTER BEACON - MALVERN    The Malvern Hills are a string of peaks that lie like the spine of a sleeping creature in the otherwise flat landscape of the Worcestershire-Herefordshire border. Whilst not the highest peaks in the UK their low-lying surroundings set these hills apart and provide brilliant views from the top. On a clear day, 13 counties have been identified from the top of Worcester Beacon. You can see the Shropshire hills and past Birmingham to Cannock Chase to the north, over to the summits of the Brecon Beacon mountains to the west, the Severn and Wye valley down to the Bristol Channel to the south and the Cotswolds over to the east. But most incredibly, if you take a line due east from the top of Worcester Beacon, the next point of land at equal altitude is the Ural Mountains in Russia.

THE VIEW FROM WORCESTER BEACON - MALVERN

The Malvern Hills are a string of peaks that lie like the spine of a sleeping creature in the otherwise flat landscape of the Worcestershire-Herefordshire border. Whilst not the highest peaks in the UK their low-lying surroundings set these hills apart and provide brilliant views from the top. On a clear day, 13 counties have been identified from the top of Worcester Beacon. You can see the Shropshire hills and past Birmingham to Cannock Chase to the north, over to the summits of the Brecon Beacon mountains to the west, the Severn and Wye valley down to the Bristol Channel to the south and the Cotswolds over to the east. But most incredibly, if you take a line due east from the top of Worcester Beacon, the next point of land at equal altitude is the Ural Mountains in Russia.