KENNET AND AVON CANAL On our Bath to Trowbridge map we designed two routes that pick their way across a varied landscape between Bath, Bradford on Avon and Trowbridge, there is no overlooking that there is a single path that you could follow that would connect these places without the need for navigation - the towpath that runs alongside the Kennet and Avon Canal. The Kennet and Avon Canal is an 87 mile waterway that runs from Reading to Bristol, connecting the River Avon at Bath, with the Kennet at Newbury and finally the Thames at Reading. It was necessary as a trade link to span the width of the south of England and was at its most profitable around the 1820’s. However, it now serves a number of different uses. It is home to many people who own and live on canal boats. It is also popular with holidaymakers, walkers, cyclists and wildlife enthusiasts - as well as the many birds that can be spotted along this stretch, and it is also home to water voles and badgers. It makes all these things accessible to mobility-impaired users as the towpaths are well maintained and frequently intersected with lanes, parking places and refreshments. The canal is a wonderful habitat and community to many.

KENNET AND AVON CANAL

On our Bath to Trowbridge map we designed two routes that pick their way across a varied landscape between Bath, Bradford on Avon and Trowbridge, there is no overlooking that there is a single path that you could follow that would connect these places without the need for navigation - the towpath that runs alongside the Kennet and Avon Canal. The Kennet and Avon Canal is an 87 mile waterway that runs from Reading to Bristol, connecting the River Avon at Bath, with the Kennet at Newbury and finally the Thames at Reading. It was necessary as a trade link to span the width of the south of England and was at its most profitable around the 1820’s. However, it now serves a number of different uses. It is home to many people who own and live on canal boats. It is also popular with holidaymakers, walkers, cyclists and wildlife enthusiasts - as well as the many birds that can be spotted along this stretch, and it is also home to water voles and badgers. It makes all these things accessible to mobility-impaired users as the towpaths are well maintained and frequently intersected with lanes, parking places and refreshments. The canal is a wonderful habitat and community to many.

RIVER SWIMMING The rivers Frome and Avon, which wind their way up this valley, offer a number of locations for wild swimming. The first to mention is at Farleigh Hungerford. The Farleigh and District Swimming Club was founded in 1932 and is believed to be the oldest swimming club in the world. Membership is required, but you can pay each time you visit (£1.50) until you reach the full membership cost of £15 per year. For this you get accessible parking, toilets and changing rooms and just a short stroll through the fields to Stowford Manor Farm (See provisions). Tellisford is a couple of miles upstream from Farleigh and is often quieter. This can be due to access as it’s about a mile from the nearest parking (top of Vaggs Hill) to the river itself. It’s worth taking the time to visit the mill that spans the river, restored by the residents of the village in 2007, which now powers those homes with hydroelectric energy. Warleigh Weir in Claverton is approximately 4 miles out of Bath, where the River Avon and the Kennet and Avon Canal run parallel. It’s best reached by the towpath, on foot or by bike. Whilst it’s often the most popular wild swimming spot due to it’s proximity to Bath, the riverside field is ample and there is always plenty of room for large groups. 

RIVER SWIMMING

The rivers Frome and Avon, which wind their way up this valley, offer a number of locations for wild swimming. The first to mention is at Farleigh Hungerford. The Farleigh and District Swimming Club was founded in 1932 and is believed to be the oldest swimming club in the world. Membership is required, but you can pay each time you visit (£1.50) until you reach the full membership cost of £15 per year. For this you get accessible parking, toilets and changing rooms and just a short stroll through the fields to Stowford Manor Farm (See provisions).

Tellisford is a couple of miles upstream from Farleigh and is often quieter. This can be due to access as it’s about a mile from the nearest parking (top of Vaggs Hill) to the river itself. It’s worth taking the time to visit the mill that spans the river, restored by the residents of the village in 2007, which now powers those homes with hydroelectric energy.

Warleigh Weir in Claverton is approximately 4 miles out of Bath, where the River Avon and the Kennet and Avon Canal run parallel. It’s best reached by the towpath, on foot or by bike. Whilst it’s often the most popular wild swimming spot due to it’s proximity to Bath, the riverside field is ample and there is always plenty of room for large groups. 

BAT CONSERVATION AT MONKTON FARLEIGH The mines beneath Monkton Farleigh are the perfect habitat for bats. 13 of the UK’s 17 species have been recorded roosting here. In 2013 a single male Geoffroy’s bat, a European mainland bat was sighted - a species which has only been spotted once before in this country.  The best time to see bats is at dawn and dusk, between April and September when they are out of hibernation and raising their young. They are can be spotted all along the Avon Valley, especially Pipistrelle bats which typically fly 5-10 metres above ground and at the edges of water, using echolocation to hunt for moths and water dwelling insects. There are a number of groups who run guided bat walks around Browns Folly and Monkton Farleigh - contact Avon Bat Group or Avon Wildlife Trust for details.

BAT CONSERVATION AT MONKTON FARLEIGH

The mines beneath Monkton Farleigh are the perfect habitat for bats. 13 of the UK’s 17 species have been recorded roosting here. In 2013 a single male Geoffroy’s bat, a European mainland bat was sighted - a species which has only been spotted once before in this country. 

The best time to see bats is at dawn and dusk, between April and September when they are out of hibernation and raising their young. They are can be spotted all along the Avon Valley, especially Pipistrelle bats which typically fly 5-10 metres above ground and at the edges of water, using echolocation to hunt for moths and water dwelling insects. There are a number of groups who run guided bat walks around Browns Folly and Monkton Farleigh - contact Avon Bat Group or Avon Wildlife Trust for details.

SALLY IN THE WOODS AND BROWNS FOLLY HAUNTING The area of woodland on the steep hillside to the east of Bath is home to Browns Folly, a Grade II listed tower built in 1845. The tower itself is not open to the public although is worth a visit for the views over the valleys towards Bath. The area around the folly is known locally as Sally in the Woods. There is no singular account as to where this name originates from, although the area is widely reported to be haunted. It is said that no birds sing in the woods and the road that runs through is an accident blackspot with many incidents remaining unexplained. One version of Sally claims that a young girl dressed in white was hit by a car whilst running out of the woods into the road. Another tells of a young woman being held prisoner in Browns Folly. But the only story with any historical accuracy tells of a woman by the name of Sally living in a hut in the woods after the death of her husband in the late 18th century. A resident of the nearby Warleigh Manor once wrote of this woman: ‘Her smoke-dried hut was like an awful cave to us children, and her thin shrill sepulchral voice still rings in my ears.’ 

SALLY IN THE WOODS AND BROWNS FOLLY HAUNTING

The area of woodland on the steep hillside to the east of Bath is home to Browns Folly, a Grade II listed tower built in 1845. The tower itself is not open to the public although is worth a visit for the views over the valleys towards Bath. The area around the folly is known locally as Sally in the Woods. There is no singular account as to where this name originates from, although the area is widely reported to be haunted. It is said that no birds sing in the woods and the road that runs through is an accident blackspot with many incidents remaining unexplained.

One version of Sally claims that a young girl dressed in white was hit by a car whilst running out of the woods into the road. Another tells of a young woman being held prisoner in Browns Folly. But the only story with any historical accuracy tells of a woman by the name of Sally living in a hut in the woods after the death of her husband in the late 18th century. A resident of the nearby Warleigh Manor once wrote of this woman: ‘Her smoke-dried hut was like an awful cave to us children, and her thin shrill sepulchral voice still rings in my ears.’ 

MONKTON FARLEIGH MINES & BOX BUNKERS The area under and between Monkton Farleigh and Box is riddled with quarries, mines and bunkers. You cannot safely gain access to this subterranean world, but spotting evidence of them above ground can be just as fun. The Farleigh Down Tunnel runs for roughly a mile linking a former ammunition depot with the mainland railway. A conveyor belt ran the full length of the tunnel transporting shells into and out of the mines.  The nearby Box mine was a limestone quarry until 1970, although it was taken over by the MOD in the early 20th Century and used as a giant air intake for the underground bunker next door, Burlington.  The Burlington bunker, which lies beneath the village of Corsham, is the UK’s biggest underground complex and was conceived in the 1950’s as the emergency government relocation site in the event of nuclear war. Burlington was fit to house 4,000 ministers and civil servants and included facilities such as a medical centre with examination rooms, a dental surgery, a bakery and alaunderette. Though it was never used, it remains one of the MODs best kept secrets and no member of the public has ever been inside.

MONKTON FARLEIGH MINES & BOX BUNKERS

The area under and between Monkton Farleigh and Box is riddled with quarries, mines and bunkers. You cannot safely gain access to this subterranean world, but spotting evidence of them above ground can be just as fun. The Farleigh Down Tunnel runs for roughly a mile linking a former ammunition depot with the mainland railway. A conveyor belt ran the full length of the tunnel transporting shells into and out of the mines. 

The nearby Box mine was a limestone quarry until 1970, although it was taken over by the MOD in the early 20th Century and used as a giant air intake for the underground bunker next door, Burlington. 

The Burlington bunker, which lies beneath the village of Corsham, is the UK’s biggest underground complex and was conceived in the 1950’s as the emergency government relocation site in the event of nuclear war. Burlington was fit to house 4,000 ministers and civil servants and included facilities such as a medical centre with examination rooms, a dental surgery, a bakery and alaunderette. Though it was never used, it remains one of the MODs best kept secrets and no member of the public has ever been inside.

BARTON FARM LABYRINTH Barton Farm is a 36 acre country park that runs between Avoncliff and Bradford on Avon. There are two path options here. The towpath will lead you canal-side, or the lower path runs beside the river. It is worth noting that the river path can be particularly muddy and slow to traverse if there has been recent rain.  However, if you do choose this route, you are likely to see a greater array of wildlife and fewer other walkers. About half way along this footpath, there is also a willow labyrinth in growth.

BARTON FARM LABYRINTH

Barton Farm is a 36 acre country park that runs between Avoncliff and Bradford on Avon. There are two path options here. The towpath will lead you canal-side, or the lower path runs beside the river. It is worth noting that the river path can be particularly muddy and slow to traverse if there has been recent rain. 

However, if you do choose this route, you are likely to see a greater array of wildlife and fewer other walkers. About half way along this footpath, there is also a willow labyrinth in growth.

THOMAS HELLIKER - TROWBRIDGE Thomas Helliker was a highly skilled shearman employed by a Trowbridge textile mill in the 19th century. When mechanisation of the industry began, jobs like Hellikers were jeopardised, this resulted in the driving down of wages by mill owners, and revolt from workers. In 1803, Thomas Helliker was accused of waving a pistol during the machine wrecking riots which took place at the mills in Trowbridge. Despite having an alibi, he was convicted and hanged on his 19th birthday, due largely to the wrongful identification of him by a nightwatchman who had been already paid £500 to give evidence. Helliker is now seen as an important figure in early trade union history and his tomb sits in St James Church graveyard.

THOMAS HELLIKER - TROWBRIDGE

Thomas Helliker was a highly skilled shearman employed by a Trowbridge textile mill in the 19th century. When mechanisation of the industry began, jobs like Hellikers were jeopardised, this resulted in the driving down of wages by mill owners, and revolt from workers. In 1803, Thomas Helliker was accused of waving a pistol during the machine wrecking riots which took place at the mills in Trowbridge. Despite having an alibi, he was convicted and hanged on his 19th birthday, due largely to the wrongful identification of him by a nightwatchman who had been already paid £500 to give evidence. Helliker is now seen as an important figure in early trade union history and his tomb sits in St James Church graveyard.

CROSS GUNS - AVONCLIFF Avoncliff is a hamlet which marks the point where the River Avon and the Kennet and Avon Canal cross. Along with a handful of houses, there is a pub here that pleases not only the walkers and explorers from nearby Bradford, but serves as a vital community service for those living on nearby canal narrowboats. The beer garden overlooking the aqueduct is perfect.

CROSS GUNS - AVONCLIFF

Avoncliff is a hamlet which marks the point where the River Avon and the Kennet and Avon Canal cross. Along with a handful of houses, there is a pub here that pleases not only the walkers and explorers from nearby Bradford, but serves as a vital community service for those living on nearby canal narrowboats. The beer garden overlooking the aqueduct is perfect.

HOT AIR BALLOONS - BATH It is said that there was a general ‘balloon craze’ in the Bristol and Bath area between 1784 -1786, with great leaps in technological advances originating here. Bristol is often considered ‘The Balloon Capital of Britain’, home to the first modern day balloon construction in 1967. And historically, the first UK manned flight attempt took place in the city in 1785. But it was in 1784, when physician Caleb Hillier Parry, successfully launched the first unmanned ‘lighter than air’ aircraft from the Crescent Gardens in Bath. The aircraft travelled 19 miles and landed west of Wells, where it was found and exhibited to the people of Somerset.  Balloons still frequently take off from the Royal Victoria Gardens in Bath and can be seen dotting the sky across the Avon Valley especially at dusk and dawn over the summer months.

HOT AIR BALLOONS - BATH

It is said that there was a general ‘balloon craze’ in the Bristol and Bath area between 1784 -1786, with great leaps in technological advances originating here.

Bristol is often considered ‘The Balloon Capital of Britain’, home to the first modern day balloon construction in 1967. And historically, the first UK manned flight attempt took place in the city in 1785.

But it was in 1784, when physician Caleb Hillier Parry, successfully launched the first unmanned ‘lighter than air’ aircraft from the Crescent Gardens in Bath. The aircraft travelled 19 miles and landed west of Wells, where it was found and exhibited to the people of Somerset. 

Balloons still frequently take off from the Royal Victoria Gardens in Bath and can be seen dotting the sky across the Avon Valley especially at dusk and dawn over the summer months.

SOCIETY COFFEE - BATH Bath has grown, in recent years, into the home of speciality coffee. Colonna and Smalls heads the scene with their list of UK and worldwide awards. Hunter and Sons serve a great cup alongside craft beers if you need a different kind of pick me up. But Society Coffee is our favourite. From the decor to the magazines, every detail is right. Plus it manages to strike that difficult balance; seriously good coffee without pretension.

SOCIETY COFFEE - BATH

Bath has grown, in recent years, into the home of speciality coffee. Colonna and Smalls heads the scene with their list of UK and worldwide awards. Hunter and Sons serve a great cup alongside craft beers if you need a different kind of pick me up. But Society Coffee is our favourite. From the decor to the magazines, every detail is right. Plus it manages to strike that difficult balance; seriously good coffee without pretension.

BERTINET BAKERY - BATH Everybody knows that you measure a good pasty by its weight. This is what tells you you’re going to get something special from the Bertinet Bakery before you’ve even unwrapped the paper bag. It’s also the ideal walking fuel. Easy to eat on the move, (although hard to move after eating.) For lighter sustenance, the pastries are excellent too. 

BERTINET BAKERY - BATH

Everybody knows that you measure a good pasty by its weight. This is what tells you you’re going to get something special from the Bertinet Bakery before you’ve even unwrapped the paper bag. It’s also the ideal walking fuel. Easy to eat on the move, (although hard to move after eating.) For lighter sustenance, the pastries are excellent too. 

BRADFORD ON AVON WEAVERS COTTAGES & TORY CHAPEL Bradford on Avon is Trowbridge's pretty little sister. Its wealth came from the same textile boom in the 18th Century, when there were so many weavers in the town, that the whole bank of cottages on the hill housed the trade. These cottages are still inhabited, and Route 2 on our map will encourage you to find your own way down through this steep warren of terraces. Unlike Trowbridge, many of the old town mills have now been redeveloped into apartments or retirement complex’s. Today, Bradford’s main economy is boutique shopping and tourism, you will find plenty of pubs and cafes to welcome you as you travel through.  For the furthest reaching views, we recommend you find the Chapel of St Mary Tory on the hill, where you can see the Westbury White Horse on the edge of Salisbury Plain, approximately 10 miles away.

BRADFORD ON AVON WEAVERS COTTAGES & TORY CHAPEL

Bradford on Avon is Trowbridge's pretty little sister. Its wealth came from the same textile boom in the 18th Century, when there were so many weavers in the town, that the whole bank of cottages on the hill housed the trade. These cottages are still inhabited, and Route 2 on our map will encourage you to find your own way down through this steep warren of terraces. Unlike Trowbridge, many of the old town mills have now been redeveloped into apartments or retirement complex’s. Today, Bradford’s main economy is boutique shopping and tourism, you will find plenty of pubs and cafes to welcome you as you travel through. 

For the furthest reaching views, we recommend you find the Chapel of St Mary Tory on the hill, where you can see the Westbury White Horse on the edge of Salisbury Plain, approximately 10 miles away.

ANCIENT SHOPS, BOOKBINDERS AND CHEMIST - BATH In the supermarket age of supplying everything to everyone, we appreciate shops who do just one thing. In Bath there are a couple like this, whose success and commitment to their trade is proven through their longevity.  A H Hale Limited is a pharmacy just over Pulteney Bridge. In operation since 1826, it's unchanged from that day to now. With potions lining the Georgian walls, it could be a stage set, if not for the real life dust. Nearby, George Bayntun started his family run bookbinding business in Bath in 1894. In 1920 he bought a bookshop, and in 1939 he combined the two business at the Manvers Street location.The 11 binders currently working here pride themselves on every process being done by hand using the largest collection of tools and blocks in the world. Every process has been refined and mastered, for their edge guilding only 23.5 carat gold is used (preferable to 24ct) and is applied using a squirrel hair brush and egg white. It could only be more magical if you made it up.

ANCIENT SHOPS, BOOKBINDERS AND CHEMIST - BATH

In the supermarket age of supplying everything to everyone, we appreciate shops who do just one thing. In Bath there are a couple like this, whose success and commitment to their trade is proven through their longevity. 

A H Hale Limited is a pharmacy just over Pulteney Bridge. In operation since 1826, it's unchanged from that day to now. With potions lining the Georgian walls, it could be a stage set, if not for the real life dust.

Nearby, George Bayntun started his family run bookbinding business in Bath in 1894. In 1920 he bought a bookshop, and in 1939 he combined the two business at the Manvers Street location.The 11 binders currently working here pride themselves on every process being done by hand using the largest collection of tools and blocks in the world. Every process has been refined and mastered, for their edge guilding only 23.5 carat gold is used (preferable to 24ct) and is applied using a squirrel hair brush and egg white. It could only be more magical if you made it up.

LOCK INN CAFE - BRADFORD ON AVON Somehow the Lock Inn has swerved gentrification in a town where nothing else has. This is a cosy cafe for the unfussy diner. The mixed seating options include the busy interior, park benches, a marquee, sheds, huts and a narrow boat. Family owned since 1990, it’s a local institution and is not only popular with Bradfordians, but was once ‘famously’ visited by ITV’s Rosie and Jim.

LOCK INN CAFE - BRADFORD ON AVON

Somehow the Lock Inn has swerved gentrification in a town where nothing else has. This is a cosy cafe for the unfussy diner. The mixed seating options include the busy interior, park benches, a marquee, sheds, huts and a narrow boat. Family owned since 1990, it’s a local institution and is not only popular with Bradfordians, but was once ‘famously’ visited by ITV’s Rosie and Jim.

CLAVERTON DOWN & BATH SKYLINE You can begin (or end) Route One of our Bath to Trowbridge map with a section of the Bath Skyline Walk. This is a 6-mile circular trail that takes you through a variety of landscapes, all with the intention of showing off the panoramic views of the city of Bath. As a world heritage site, the history and Georgian architecture are what most visitors come to see, and there is no better way to view it than from the hillsides that surround the city. The Skyline walk is at it’s best in May and June when the meadows of Bathwick and Claverton Down are just starting to celebrate the oncoming summer. The buttercups which pepper the grass with abundance, leave the path clear, as if encouraging you to find your way. The ground comes alive with the gentle movement of dragonflies, grasshoppers and beetles, not to mention ancient ant hills, and if you’re lucky (and quiet enough) you might see deer, who have been known to graze this land too.

CLAVERTON DOWN & BATH SKYLINE

You can begin (or end) Route One of our Bath to Trowbridge map with a section of the Bath Skyline Walk. This is a 6-mile circular trail that takes you through a variety of landscapes, all with the intention of showing off the panoramic views of the city of Bath. As a world heritage site, the history and Georgian architecture are what most visitors come to see, and there is no better way to view it than from the hillsides that surround the city. The Skyline walk is at it’s best in May and June when the meadows of Bathwick and Claverton Down are just starting to celebrate the oncoming summer. The buttercups which pepper the grass with abundance, leave the path clear, as if encouraging you to find your way. The ground comes alive with the gentle movement of dragonflies, grasshoppers and beetles, not to mention ancient ant hills, and if you’re lucky (and quiet enough) you might see deer, who have been known to graze this land too.

THE GEORGE INN - BATHAMPTON The George Inn has turned from monastery into country pub in the last 800 years. It sits beside the canal and lures in passersby with its outdoor seating in summer and open fires in winter. Just a 20 minute stroll back into the city from here makes it a perfect destination if you want more pub than walk. 

THE GEORGE INN - BATHAMPTON

The George Inn has turned from monastery into country pub in the last 800 years. It sits beside the canal and lures in passersby with its outdoor seating in summer and open fires in winter. Just a 20 minute stroll back into the city from here makes it a perfect destination if you want more pub than walk. 

HARTLEY FARM - WINSLEY Working farm / cafe / farm shop / butchers. The converted barn cafe is fringed with fields (and a little bunting) and is just what you want to stumble across during a long walk for a tea and slice of homemade cake. If you’ve got the motivation for an early morning adventure, we recommend this as a breakfast spot. All the food is locally sourced, most of the ingredients can be bought in the attached shop, the only tricky thing is not to leave with a rucksack weighed down with delicious purchases.

HARTLEY FARM - WINSLEY

Working farm / cafe / farm shop / butchers. The converted barn cafe is fringed with fields (and a little bunting) and is just what you want to stumble across during a long walk for a tea and slice of homemade cake. If you’ve got the motivation for an early morning adventure, we recommend this as a breakfast spot. All the food is locally sourced, most of the ingredients can be bought in the attached shop, the only tricky thing is not to leave with a rucksack weighed down with delicious purchases.

TROWBRIDGE MILLS AND MUSEUM The industrial history of Trowbridge dates back to the late 18th/early 19th century, when it was the foremost producer of woven textile cloth in the South West. At its peak of production, there were 20 textile mills operating in Trowbridge.  It was the introduction of mechanised production that began the industrial decline in Trowbridge, and the last working mill closed in 1982.  The legacy of this prosperous time is still visible today in the town’s architecture. Although largely underused, a lot of the mills remain standing. The Industrial and Architectural Trail map, which you can pick up from the museum, is a useful guide to discovering these buildings. Some are unique, like Handle House, which is the only known example of it’s kind in the country – originally designed and used for drying teazels used in textile production. The Museum lives in a section of Home Mill, access to which can be gained through The Shires shopping centre. In here you can see looms in action, and even buy samples of cloth.  Trowbridge today remains a working town, it has been less closely conserved than neighbouring Bradford on Avon. But with thriving industry and rich cultural diversity, it’s well worth the time to explore.

TROWBRIDGE MILLS AND MUSEUM

The industrial history of Trowbridge dates back to the late 18th/early 19th century, when it was the foremost producer of woven textile cloth in the South West. At its peak of production, there were 20 textile mills operating in Trowbridge. 

It was the introduction of mechanised production that began the industrial decline in Trowbridge, and the last working mill closed in 1982. 

The legacy of this prosperous time is still visible today in the town’s architecture. Although largely underused, a lot of the mills remain standing. The Industrial and Architectural Trail map, which you can pick up from the museum, is a useful guide to discovering these buildings. Some are unique, like Handle House, which is the only known example of it’s kind in the country – originally designed and used for drying teazels used in textile production.

The Museum lives in a section of Home Mill, access to which can be gained through The Shires shopping centre. In here you can see looms in action, and even buy samples of cloth. 

Trowbridge today remains a working town, it has been less closely conserved than neighbouring Bradford on Avon. But with thriving industry and rich cultural diversity, it’s well worth the time to explore.

SUSTRANS TUNNELS On the route of the disused Somerset and Dorset railway, now run the longest walking and cycling tunnels in the UK. The Greenway Two Tunnels opened in 2013 and connect the valley at Midford to Bath’s Oldfield Park . The tunnels run consecutively at 1.7km and 0.8km long and are open only to walkers and cyclists to enjoy. It’s a surreal experience to pass through these tunnels - the initial intrigue as you leave the leafy green avenues and enter the open mouth of the tunnel soon becomes actually quite disconcerting the further into the hillside you get. The lighting is dim and sporadic, and as the temperature drops to slightly below comfortable, faint classical music begins to play from hidden speakers. It takes longer than you think to walk 1.7km, take a coat, and a friend.

SUSTRANS TUNNELS

On the route of the disused Somerset and Dorset railway, now run the longest walking and cycling tunnels in the UK. The Greenway Two Tunnels opened in 2013 and connect the valley at Midford to Bath’s Oldfield Park . The tunnels run consecutively at 1.7km and 0.8km long and are open only to walkers and cyclists to enjoy. It’s a surreal experience to pass through these tunnels - the initial intrigue as you leave the leafy green avenues and enter the open mouth of the tunnel soon becomes actually quite disconcerting the further into the hillside you get. The lighting is dim and sporadic, and as the temperature drops to slightly below comfortable, faint classical music begins to play from hidden speakers. It takes longer than you think to walk 1.7km, take a coat, and a friend.

HERMAN MILLER - BATH Herman Miller is a furniture manufacturer based in Michigan USA, founded in 1905. It was under directorship of architect George Nelson in 1945 that it became a pioneer of modernist furniture and probably the most prolific producer of this style to date. The company is famed for producing notable design classics such and the Eames Lounge Chair, Marshmallow Sofa and the Ball Clock.  In the 1970’s it became necessary for Herman Miller to develop a UK headquarters, to service the rest of Europe. So architect Nicholas Grimshaw was awarded the task of designing the site in Bath. The river-side Locksbrook Road factory opened in 1979, as an embodiment of the Herman Miller philosophy, and with ‘maximum relation of work spaces to the outdoors’. The building still stands, despite the company outgrowing it after 40 years use (they have moved to nearby Melksham, into a newly designed Nicholas Grimshaw building) The old site is now being redeveloped to house the Bath Spa University School of Art and Design.

HERMAN MILLER - BATH

Herman Miller is a furniture manufacturer based in Michigan USA, founded in 1905. It was under directorship of architect George Nelson in 1945 that it became a pioneer of modernist furniture and probably the most prolific producer of this style to date. The company is famed for producing notable design classics such and the Eames Lounge Chair, Marshmallow Sofa and the Ball Clock. 

In the 1970’s it became necessary for Herman Miller to develop a UK headquarters, to service the rest of Europe. So architect Nicholas Grimshaw was awarded the task of designing the site in Bath. The river-side Locksbrook Road factory opened in 1979, as an embodiment of the Herman Miller philosophy, and with ‘maximum relation of work spaces to the outdoors’. The building still stands, despite the company outgrowing it after 40 years use (they have moved to nearby Melksham, into a newly designed Nicholas Grimshaw building) The old site is now being redeveloped to house the Bath Spa University School of Art and Design.

INN AT FRESHFORD The joy of this pub is largely down to its location. Set on the edge of the village of Freshford, it looks out over fields and the point where our two rivers meet.  It’s also almost exactly half way between Bath and Bradford, which makes it an excellent destination if you’re looking for a shorter route (Freshford train station will take you back in either direction in 10 mins) The Sunday roasts are worth the walk, and they do takeaway pizzas, perfect for an evening picnic on the riverbank. 

INN AT FRESHFORD

The joy of this pub is largely down to its location. Set on the edge of the village of Freshford, it looks out over fields and the point where our two rivers meet. 

It’s also almost exactly half way between Bath and Bradford, which makes it an excellent destination if you’re looking for a shorter route (Freshford train station will take you back in either direction in 10 mins) The Sunday roasts are worth the walk, and they do takeaway pizzas, perfect for an evening picnic on the riverbank. 

WATER TOWERS The design of watertowers across the world is more varied, creative and eye-catching than you might think necessary of a municipal structure. They caught the eyes of artists and photographers Bernt and Hilla Becher, who documented these industrial structures through a series of photographs, highlighting their beauty and diversity. Often overlooked on our landscapes, these objects of civic architecture have a lot to be admired. From their design to their secondary use as wayfaring beacons. There is one on our map at Pipehouse which can be seen from a great distance but cannot be closely reached. There is a second with even more concrete detail at Colerne just off this map to north-east. Both are worth a visit.

WATER TOWERS

The design of watertowers across the world is more varied, creative and eye-catching than you might think necessary of a municipal structure. They caught the eyes of artists and photographers Bernt and Hilla Becher, who documented these industrial structures through a series of photographs, highlighting their beauty and diversity. Often overlooked on our landscapes, these objects of civic architecture have a lot to be admired. From their design to their secondary use as wayfaring beacons. There is one on our map at Pipehouse which can be seen from a great distance but cannot be closely reached. There is a second with even more concrete detail at Colerne just off this map to north-east. Both are worth a visit.

THE GEORGE INN - NORTON ST PHILLIP The George Inn claims to be Britain’s oldest inn, serving up its first pint in 1397. The central courtyard would have been used for patrons to tie up their horses, although there are recorded hangings here too.  The pub itself is a warren of small cosy rooms and a garden with incredible views. It’s at the upper end of pub prices but it’s worth it for the ancient experience.

THE GEORGE INN - NORTON ST PHILLIP

The George Inn claims to be Britain’s oldest inn, serving up its first pint in 1397. The central courtyard would have been used for patrons to tie up their horses, although there are recorded hangings here too. 

The pub itself is a warren of small cosy rooms and a garden with incredible views. It’s at the upper end of pub prices but it’s worth it for the ancient experience.

PILL BOXES There are thought to be approximately 6500 pillboxes still in existence across the UK. Take a walk beside the River Avon, or the River Frome in this valley and you’ll not be able to miss these concrete relics that pop up at intervals along the waterways. Their distribution in the South West, when plotted onto a map, reveal a number of very distinct connecting lines, or stop lines, as they were known in the 1940’s.  The GHQ Stop Line was a vast defence strategy, built as a method of delaying invading armies, thus protecting London and the valuable industrial centre of Britain. The line ran ultimately from the Bristol channel, across the south from east to west, skirting London and heading north to Edinburgh. it was made up of connecting smaller lines, colour coded by name, 2 of which meet in the middle of our map.

PILL BOXES

There are thought to be approximately 6500 pillboxes still in existence across the UK. Take a walk beside the River Avon, or the River Frome in this valley and you’ll not be able to miss these concrete relics that pop up at intervals along the waterways. Their distribution in the South West, when plotted onto a map, reveal a number of very distinct connecting lines, or stop lines, as they were known in the 1940’s. 

The GHQ Stop Line was a vast defence strategy, built as a method of delaying invading armies, thus protecting London and the valuable industrial centre of Britain. The line ran ultimately from the Bristol channel, across the south from east to west, skirting London and heading north to Edinburgh. it was made up of connecting smaller lines, colour coded by name, 2 of which meet in the middle of our map.

THE ANGELFISH CAFE The Angelfish Cafe is just a few minutes walk from Dundas Aqueduct on the canal. Being one of the few refreshment stops along this stretch it’s definitely worth a mention. Although it offers quite a large menu of hot and cold food, we like it best for teas, ice creams and the view.

THE ANGELFISH CAFE

The Angelfish Cafe is just a few minutes walk from Dundas Aqueduct on the canal. Being one of the few refreshment stops along this stretch it’s definitely worth a mention. Although it offers quite a large menu of hot and cold food, we like it best for teas, ice creams and the view.